Source: Secretariat of National Aboriginal and Islander Child Care

Source: The 5 core elements of the Child Placement Principle poster

The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Child Placement Principle (Principle) recognises that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have the knowledge and experience to make the best decisions concerning their children and recognises the importance of each child staying connected to their family, community, culture and country.

Source: NSW Government Family and Community Services - Caring for a Child

Life story work is a method used to record the details about a child or young person’s history and personal development. It is a record of their life in words, pictures and photos made by the child or young person with help from a trusted adult or other person having a meaningful relationship with the child or young person.

My Life Story Book has been developed to assist children and young people in out-of-home care develop a sense of self, in relation to their life experiences. It is a chronological account of the child or young person’s history, and should be started when the child enters out-of-home care and maintained throughout their time in care.\

Aboriginal life story

Download My Life Story book - Aboriginal version (PDF 11884.97 KB)

The Aboriginal version of My Life Story Book supports Aboriginal children in out-of-home care in understanding more about their cultural identity and in developing a sense of connectedness to family, kinship groups and the community.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people placed in care have similar needs to non-Aboriginal children. However, there are differences that are specific to Aboriginal children and young people.

It is especially important to provide for their cultural needs as this helps them grow up strong, knowing who they are, where they come from and how they fit into their community. It is important to include information about an Aboriginal child’s family, community and culture in their life story. This information can be found by talking with:

  • the child or young person
  • their parents or extended family
  • Aboriginal workers
  • their caseworker
  • Aboriginal leaders
  • Aboriginal organisations and community groups
  • using internet, libraries, books and videos
  • attending art exhibitions, performing arts events, concerts and cultural camps.

Source: AFSS Cultural Activities Resource Booklet

This Cultural Activities Resource Booklet has been prepared by AFSS to assist you in connecting the children and young people in your care with culture.

Source: Connecting to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Culture: A Resource to help Carers connect children and young people in their care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture

The resource was developed by CF&KC-SA and is designed to assist carers to connect children and young people in their care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture.

Children’s Day has been celebrated on the 4th of August for more than 30 years. It’s a special time for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to celebrate children, and for all Aussies to learn about more about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures.

The Secretariat of National Aboriginal and Islander Child Care (SNAICC) ‘Supporting Carers to Care for our Children’ resource is designed to support and empower you in your day-to-day caring role of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.

The Australian Institute of Family Studies Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Child and Family Resources Portal is available to provide support information to help keep Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children safe and happy in their communities.

AFSS is the lead Aboriginal foster care agency in South Australia. It also provides a range of family support programs including:

  • Circle of Security-Parenting
  • Seasons for Healing (grief and loss program)
  • Healthy Homes
  • Resilient Families
  • Reunification
  • Targeted Intervention
  • Aboriginal Gambling Help Services
  • a broad range of cultural services.

Phone: 8205 1500
Email:  afss@afss.com.au
Website: www.afss.com.au

DeadlyKidsSA aims to support Aboriginal children to be happy, healthy and strong by providing a number of different activities to promote the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal children and their families across South Australia. Its activities include supporting fun and healthy cultural events such as the annual Strong Aboriginal Children’s Health Expo and the provision of “Get Set, Go!” backpacks through the Aboriginal Children’s Backpack program.

Email: HealthDeadlyKidsSA@sa.gov.au

Nunkuwarrin Yunti is the largest Aboriginal community-controlled health service in South Australia. It offers a wide range of primary health, social and emotional wellbeing, health promotion and health training and development services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Nunkuwarrin Yunti’s Link-Up SA Program provides family tracing, reunion and counselling services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and their families who have been separated under past policies and practices of the Australian Government. Assistance is also provided to people over the age of 18 years who have been adopted, fostered or raised in institutions.

Phone: (08) 8406 1600

Email:  nunku@nunku.org.au

Watto Purrunna Aboriginal Primary Health Care Service provides a free comprehensive program of culturally-sensitive services across Adelaide’s northern and central regions. ‘Watto Purrunna’ is a Kaurna term meaning ‘the branch of life’.

Phone: 8182 9206