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6.24 - Final Report

In consultation with the eSafety Commissioner, police commissioners from states and territories and the Australian Federal Police should continue to ensure national capability for coordinated, best practice responses by law enforcement agencies to online child sexual abuse. This could include through:

  1. establishing regular meetings of the heads of cybersafety units in all Australian police departments to ensure a consistent capacity to respond to emerging incidents and share best practice approaches, tools and resources
  2. convening regular forums and conferences to bring together law enforcement, government, the technology industry, the community sector and other relevant
  3. stakeholders to discuss emerging issues, set agendas and identify solutions to online child sexual abuse and exploitation
  4. building capability across police departments, through in-service training for:
    1. frontline police officers to respond to public complaints relating to issues of online child sexual abuse or harmful sexual behaviours
    2. police officers who liaise with young people in school and community settings.

SAPOL has a number of initiatives in place that support Recommendation 6.24:

  • Membership of the National Cybercrime Joint Management Group.
  • The Child Protection Working Group, under the national Serious Organised Crime Coordination Committee. This forum also oversees the Joint Anti Child Exploitation Team (JACET) model in each jurisdiction.
  • SAPOL has developed an Online Covert Investigations (Child Exploitation) Course, which was first conducted in November 2017.
  • SAPOL's State Community Engagement Section has been working in partnership with the Australian Federal Police to deliver the "ThinkUKnow" sessions to a large number of community groups in South Australia for the past four years.
  • Sexual offence training is provided to SAPOL recruits at the Academy, and a filming and sexting online training package is also available to officers.

Further to these initiatives, SAPOL has a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the eSafety Commissioner which outlines the process for the exchange of information.

Referrals from the eSafety Commissioner are received by SAPOL on the Australian Cybercrime Online Reporting Network. SAPOL’s Public Protection Branch commenced operation on 18 October 2018 which provides coordination of SAPOL policy and training in regard to matters of child protection, including online child sexual abuse.

Government response: Accepted
Lead agency: South Australia Police
Recommendation progress status: Complete

2 - Criminal Justice Report

Australian governments should refer to the Steering Committee for the Report on Government Services for review the issues of:

  1. how the reporting framework for police services in the Report on Government Services could be extended to include reporting on child sexual abuse offences
  2. whether any outcome measures that would be appropriate for police investigations of child sexual abuse offences could be developed and reported on.

Issues related to reporting on child sexual abuse offences have been referred to the Steering Committee for the Report on Government Services (ROGS) and the ROGS Police Working Group for review.

The South Australian Government will continue to work collaboratively with its Federal, state and territory counterparts through these forums.

Government response: Accepted
Lead agency: South Australia Police
Recommendation progress status: Complete

3 - Criminal Justice Report

Each Australian government should ensure that its policing agency:

  1. recognises that a victim or survivor’s initial contact with police will be important in determining their satisfaction with the entire criminal justice response and in influencing their willingness to proceed with a report and to participate in a prosecution
  2. ensures that all police who may come into contact with victims or survivors of institutional child sexual abuse are trained to:
    1. have a basic understanding of complex trauma and how it can affect people who report to police, including those who may have difficulties dealing with institutions or persons in positions of authority (such as the police)
    2. treat anyone who approaches the police to report child sexual abuse with consideration and respect, taking account of any relevant cultural safety issues
  3. establishes arrangements to ensure that, on initial contact from a victim or survivor, police refer victims and survivors to appropriate support services.

SAPOL has addressed this recommendation through the review of relevant policies and training and the implementation of the Public Protection Branch. General Orders including 'Victims', 'Sexual Offences' and 'Interviewing Suspects and Vulnerable Witnesses', together with the Interagency Practice in Child Protection Course, provide SAPOL members with a broad understanding of the dynamics of child sexual abuse and how trauma may impact on their ability to interact with police and the judicial system in general.

Recent online training on Children and Vulnerable Adults has also been implemented across SAPOL.

Government response: Accepted
Lead agency: South Australia Police
Recommendation progress status: Complete

4 - Criminal Justice Report

To encourage reporting of allegations of child sexual abuse, including institutional child sexual abuse, each Australian government should ensure that its policing agency:

  1. takes steps to communicate to victims (and their families or support people where the victims are children or are particularly vulnerable) that their decision whether to participate in a police investigation will be respected – that is, victims retain the right to withdraw at any stage in the process and to decline to proceed further with police and/or any prosecution
  2. provides information on the different ways in which victims and survivors can report to police or seek advice from police on their options for reporting or not reporting abuse – this should be in a format that allows institutions and survivor advocacy and support groups and support services to provide it to victims and survivors
  3. makes available a range of channels to encourage reporting, including specialist telephone numbers and online reporting forms, and provides information about what to expect from each channel of reporting
  4. works with survivor advocacy and support groups and support services, including those working with people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds and people with disability, to facilitate reporting by victims and survivors
  5. allows victims and survivors to benefit from the presence of a support person of their choice if they so wish throughout their dealings with police, provided that this will not interfere with the police investigation or risk contaminating evidence
  6. is willing to take statements from victims and survivors in circumstances where the alleged perpetrator is dead or is otherwise unlikely to be able to be tried.

SAPOL has addressed this recommendation through the review of relevant policies and training and the implementation of the Public Protection Branch. General Orders including 'Victims', 'Sexual Offences' and 'Interviewing Suspects and Vulnerable Witnesses', together with the Interagency Practice in Child Protection Course, provide SAPOL members with a broad understanding of the dynamics of child sexual abuse and how trauma may impact on their ability to interact with police and the judicial system in general.

Recent online training on Children and Vulnerable Adults has also been implemented across SAPOL.

The Communication Partner scheme through Uniting Communities provides trained independent volunteers to facilitate effective communication with people who have complex communication needs during police interviews, investigations and court proceedings.

Government response: Accepted
Lead agency: South Australia Police
Recommendation progress status: Complete

5 - Criminal Justice Report

To encourage reporting of allegations of child sexual abuse, including institutional child sexual abuse, among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander victims and survivors, each Australian government should ensure that its policing agency:

  1. takes the lead in developing good relationships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities
  2. provides channels for reporting outside of the community (such as telephone numbers and online reporting forms).

a) SAPOL has taken a number of steps to address this recommendation, including:

  • establishing regular liaison and monthly meetings with the Aboriginal Legal Rights Movement
  • actively participating in Aboriginal youth justice forums
  • implementing the SAPOL Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) 2017-2020, which prioritises the development of meaningful relationships with Aboriginal people
  • extensive work completed towards developing a strategy for SAPOL to engage with Aboriginal People within the organisation and wider Aboriginal Community in line with RAP ‘Actions’ and ‘Deliverables.’
  • establishing the position of Aboriginal Policy Officer, responsible for developing new initiatives to engage with Aboriginal stakeholders and communities with a focus on breaking down barriers between Police and young Aboriginal people. To do this, SAPOL actively participates in Community events (such as but not limited to):
    • Don McSweeny Lands Cup
    • Aboriginal Power Cup
    • NAIDOC and Reconciliation Week activities
    • Award ceremonies, including being actively involved in nominating recipients within the Aboriginal community
    • Participation in Local and National Aboriginal-focussed forums that include youth leadership forums
    • Local Aboriginal community group meetings
  • establishing regular liaison with Reconciliation SA
  • supporting Aboriginal staff to connect, reconnect and engage with their communities by providing education and support
  • involving and partnering with Aboriginal support services and stakeholders regarding Aboriginal business within SAPOL and referring Aboriginal people to them where possible
  • participating in the SA Government Reconciliation Network Working Group meetings as well as SAPOL being represented on the Senior Officers Group for Aboriginal Affairs and the Chief Executive Group for Aboriginal Affairs.

b) There are mechanisms already in place for reporting abuse to police, including the involvement of other supporting social groups and agencies. There is no differentiation for reporting mechanisms for Aboriginal communities. However, SAPOL has Aboriginal Community Constables employed across metropolitan, regional and remote locations across South Australia who can provide support for any Aboriginal child and their families when a report is made.

Government response: Accepted

Lead agency: South Australia Police

Recommendation progress status: Complete

6 - Criminal Justice Report

To encourage prisoners and former prisoners to report allegations of child sexual abuse, including institutional child sexual abuse, each Australian government should ensure that its policing agency:

  1. provides channels for reporting that can be used from prison and that allow reports to be made confidentially
  2. does not require former prisoners to report at a police station.

  1. South Australia Police (SAPOL) currently has investigators within the Police Corrections Team in the Offender Management Section of the Public Protection Branch as well as in District Criminal Investigation Branches to facilitate such reports while people are in custody when advice is received from the Department for Correctional Services. The Department for Correctional Services do not currently have a dedicated phone line in place whereby prisoners can specifically report instances of child sexual abuse. However, SAPOL’s Major Crime Investigation Branch (MCIB) has widely publicised a confidential police phone number for prisoners to call to report information regarding cold case homicides.  Any information provided to MCIB via this phone line regarding child sexual abuse is forwarded to SAPOL’s Public Protection Branch for appropriate action.
  2. Reports for all matters either commence while in custody, or at a police station if post-custody, to facilitate the taking of statements and any other identified evidence by investigators. When a prisoner is in custody, police have the ability to investigate in a secure location within the facility or the power to remove the person pursuant to the Correctional Services Act 1982 to investigate an offence. Police have capability for contact using audio visual links, which are also used in court appearances, and it is foreseen that initial reports could also use the same process if required.  Initial reports post-custody are largely made by frontline staff members unless there are exceptional circumstances, such as complex communication needs, in which case other provisions will be made. Further, the office for South Australia’s Commissioner for Victim’s Rights is an avenue that victims can contact if they are concerned about going to a police station to report a crime. Information can then be passed onto police for follow up with the victim.
Government response: a) Accepted b) Not accepted
Lead agency: South Australia Police
Recommendation progress status: a) Complete b) Not accepted

7 - Criminal Justice Report

Each Australian government should ensure that its policing agency conducts investigations of reports of child sexual abuse, including institutional child sexual abuse, in accordance with the following principles:

  1. While recognising the complexity of police rosters, staffing and transfers, police should recognise the benefit to victims and their families and survivors of continuity in police staffing and should take steps to facilitate, to the extent possible, continuity in police
    staffing on an investigation of a complaint
  2. Police should recognise the importance to victims and their families and survivors of police maintaining regular communication with them to keep them informed of the status of their report and any investigation unless they have asked not to be kept informed
  3. Particularly in relation to historical allegations of institutional child sexual abuse, police who assess or provide an investigative response to allegations should be trained to:
    1. be non-judgmental and recognise that many victims of child sexual abuse will go on to develop substance abuse and mental health problems, and some may have a criminal record
    2. focus on the credibility of the complaint or allegation rather than focusing only on the credibility of the complainant.

SAPOL’s Public Protection Branch, Family and Domestic Violence Branch and Criminal Investigation Branches conduct investigations into reports of child sexual abuse.

a) Current existing arrangements provide continuity in investigations which will be further maximised under organisational reform processes enhancing 24/7 capability.

b) SAPOL has current existing policies covering this aspect. Victim Contact Officers and Victim Management Section members provide this service to victims along with investigating officers.

c) SAPOL currently has training processes addressing this aspect at recruit level, and specialist levels including detectives and prosecutors, interagency courses for investigating child abuse and a Specialist Investigative Interviewing course.

Government response: Accepted
Lead agency: South Australia Police
Recommendation progress status: Complete

8 - Criminal Justice Report

State and territory governments should introduce legislation to implement Recommendation 20-1 of the report of the Australian Law Reform Commission and the New South Wales Law Reform Commission Family violence: A national legal response in relation to disclosing or revealing the identity of a mandatory reporter to a law enforcement agency.

Existing legislation is consistent with these recommendations. Section 163 of the Children and Young People (Safety) Act 2017 and Regulation 41 of the Children and Young People (Safety) Regulations 2017 deal with protecting the identity of a notifier and the circumstances when their identity may be disclosed. Regulation 41(a) permits the disclosure of the identity of a mandatory notifier in the course of official duties, which would include disclosure to South Australia Police (SAPOL) for the purposes of a criminal investigation.

Consideration will be given to further clarifying these provisions in line with the recommendation.

Government response: Accepted
Lead agency: Department for Child Protection (DCP)
Recommendation progress status: Implementing

9 - Criminal Justice Report

Each Australian government should ensure that its policing agency conducts investigative interviewing in relation to reports of child sexual abuse, including institutional child sexual abuse, in accordance with the following principles:

  1. all police who provide an investigative response (whether specialist or generalist) to child sexual abuse should receive at least basic training in understanding sexual offending, including the nature of child sexual abuse and institutional child sexual abuse offending
  2. all police who provide an investigative response (whether specialist or generalist) to child sexual abuse should be trained to
    interview the complainant in accordance with current research and learning about how memory works in order to obtain the complainant’s memory of the events
  3. the importance of video recorded interviews for children and other vulnerable witnesses should be recognised, as these interviews usually form all, or most, of the complainant’s and other relevant witnesses’ evidence in chief in any prosecution
  4. investigative interviewing of children and other vulnerable witnesses should be undertaken by police with specialist training. The specialist training should focus on:
    1. a specialist understanding of child sexual abuse, including institutional child sexual abuse, and the developmental and
    2. communication needs of children and other vulnerable witnesses
  5. skill development in planning and conducting interviews, including use of appropriate questioning techniques
  6. specialist police should undergo refresher training on a periodical basis to ensure that their specialist understanding and skills remain up to date and accord with current research
  7. from time to time, experts should review a sample of video recorded interviews with children and other vulnerable witnesses conducted by specialist police for quality assurance and training purposes and to reinforce best-practice interviewing techniques
  8. state and territory governments should introduce legislation to remove any impediments, including in relation to privacy concerns, to the use of video recorded interviews so that the relevant police officer, his or her supervisor and any persons engaged by police in quality assurance and training can review video recorded interviews for quality assurance and training
    purposes. This should not authorise the use of video recorded interviews for general training in a manner that would raise privacy concerns
  9. police should continue to work towards improving the technical quality of video recorded interviews so that they are technically as effective as possible in presenting the complainant’s and other witnesses’ evidence in chief
  10. police should recognise the importance of interpreters, including for some Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander victims, survivors and other witnesses
  11. intermediaries should be available to assist in police investigative interviews of children and other vulnerable witnesses.

December 2018 update

South Australia Police (SAPOL) supports and is largely compliant with all aspects of this recommendation at recruit and specialist levels.  Part (e) & (f) were supported and in the process of being implemented in 2018. This progress report focusses on parts (e) & (f).

In relation to part (e):

  • In December 2018 the Victim Management Team developed a face to face District Refresher Training package aimed at maintaining and enhancing the skill set of qualified SAPOL prescribed interviewers.   The Victim Management Team has continued to provide refresher training across the organisation to country and metropolitan qualified SAPOL members.
  • Specialist training in relation to interviewing techniques of vulnerable witnesses is also delivered to SAPOL members by the Centre for Investigative Interviewing at Griffith University. Griffith University also provide face to face refresher training to members who have successfully completed their course. Members who have completed the course are also able to undertake refresher mock interviews over the telephone using a scripted role player from Griffith University who provides constructive feedback to participants.

In relation to part (f):

  • The Victim Management Team who are specialist interviewers within the Public Protection Branch are often called upon to review and provide constructive feedback on vulnerable witness interviews conducted by prescribed interviewers attached to SAPOL Districts and Local Service Areas.
  • Regular joint meetings are led by the Vulnerable Witness Team of the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions with representatives from the Public Protection Branch.  It is the responsibility of Public Protection Branch staff, in particular the Victim Management Team, to review the interview in question and provide educational advice and training to the prescribed interviewer.
  • The Griffith University team are available to provide advice and feedback on interview plans and questioning styles to all members who have participated in their Specialist Interviewing Course. The Griffith University team encourage current and past participants to regularly take part in refresher mock interviews with their staff where expert feedback is provided.

Government response: Accepted
Lead agency: South Australia Police
Recommendation progress status: Complete

10 - Criminal Justice Report

Each Australian government should ensure that its policing agency makes decisions in relation to whether to lay charges for child sexual abuse offences in accordance with the following principles:

  1. recognising that it is important to complainants that the correct charges be laid as early as possible so that charges are not significantly downgraded at or close to trial, police should ensure that care is taken, and that early prosecution advice is sought, where appropriate, in laying charges
  2. in making decisions about whether to charge, police should not:
    1. expect or require corroboration where the victim or survivor’s account does not suggest that there should be any corroboration available
    2. rely on the absence of corroboration as a determinative factor in deciding not to charge, where the victim or survivor’s account does not suggest that there should be any corroboration available, unless the prosecution service advises otherwise.

SAPOL’s Prosecution Services Branch (PSB) adjudicates with the principles outlined in the recommendation in mind. Appropriate charges should be identified and laid from the outset. As such, PSB will largely engage with the victim at the adjudication stage prior to charges being laid in court.

Corroboration or lack thereof, is but one factor for PSB and Office for the Director of Public Prosecutions (ODPP) adjudicators to consider as per the DPP Guidelines, which police prosecutors also follow. It is not a determinative factor.

Government response: Accepted
Lead agency: South Australia Police
Recommendation progress status: Complete

11 - Criminal Justice Report

The Victorian Government should review the operation of section 401 of the Criminal Procedure Act 2009 (Vic) and consider amending the provision to restrict the awarding of costs against police if it appears that the risk of costs awards might be affecting police decisions to prosecute. The government of any other state or territory that has similar provisions should conduct a similar review and should consider similar amendments.

SAPOL’s Prosecution Services Branch (PSB) does not consider the issue of cost when determining to prosecute or continue to prosecute. PSB utilises the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions (ODPP) guidelines and considers reasonable prospect of conviction and public interest.

Government response: Accepted
Lead agency: South Australia Police
Recommendation progress status: Complete

12 - Criminal Justice Report

Each Australian government should ensure that, if its policing agency does not provide a specialist response to victims and survivors reporting historical child sexual abuse, its policing agency develops and implements a document in the nature of a ‘guarantee of service’ which sets out for the benefit of victims and survivors – and as a reminder to the police involved – what victims and survivors are entitled to expect in the police response to their report of child sexual abuse. The document should include information to the effect that victims and survivors are entitled to:

  1. be treated by police with consideration and respect, taking account of any relevant cultural safety issues
  2. have their views about whether they wish to participate in the police investigation respected
  3. be referred to appropriate support services
  4. contact police through a support person or organisation rather than contacting police directly if they prefer
  5. have the assistance of a support person of their choice throughout their dealings with police unless this will interfere with the police investigation or risk contaminating evidence
  6. have their statement taken by police even if the alleged perpetrator is dead
  7. be provided with the details of a nominated person within the police service for them to contact
  8. be kept informed of the status of their report and any investigation unless they do not wish to be kept informed
  9. have the police focus on the credibility of the complaint or allegations rather than focusing only on the credibility of the complainant, recognising that many victims of child sexual abuse will go on to develop substance abuse and mental health problems, and some may have a criminal record.

The details of a Guarantee of Service style document are addressed through the review of corporate policies and provision of specialist training. SAPOL’s General Orders including 'Victims', 'Sexual Offences' and 'Interviewing Suspects and Vulnerable Witnesses', together with the Interagency Practice in Child Protection Course, provide SAPOL members with a broad understanding of the dynamics of child sexual abuse and how trauma may impact on their ability to interact with police and the judicial system in general.

SAPOL has established a Public Protection Branch (PPB) and has enhanced the Family Violence Investigation Sections and Criminal Investigation Branches as a result of the new District Policing model. Historical child sexual abuse cases are investigated by these branches with the Sexual Crime Investigation Teams of the PPB undertaking the more complex matters.

Government response: Accepted
Lead agency: South Australia Police
Recommendation progress status: Complete

13 - Criminal Justice Report

Each Australian government should ensure that its policing agency responds to victims and survivors with disability, or their representatives, who report or seek to report child sexual abuse, including institutional child sexual abuse, to police in accordance with the following principles:

  1. police who have initial contact with the victim or survivor should be non-judgmental and should not make any adverse assessment of the victim or survivor’s credibility, reliability or ability to make a report or participate in a police investigation or prosecution because of their disability
  2. police who assess or provide an investigative response to allegations made by victims and survivors with disability should focus on the credibility of the complaint or allegation rather than focusing only on the credibility of the complainant, and they should not make any adverse assessment of the victim or survivor’s credibility or reliability because of their disability
  3. police who conduct investigative interviewing should make all appropriate use of any available intermediary scheme, and communication supports, to ensure that the victim or survivor is able to give their best evidence in the investigative interview
  4. decisions in relation to whether to lay charges for child sexual abuse offences should take full account of the ability of any available intermediary scheme, and communication supports, to assist the victim or survivor to give their best evidence when required in the prosecution process.

In 2016, South Australia introduced an intermediary scheme under the Disability Justice Plan. SAPOL has the legislative and regulatory framework, and the support of volunteer services provisioned by Uniting Communities, to support interviews of vulnerable witnesses as intermediaries. The legislative and regulatory frameworks also allow for the use of communication assistants, communication devices, and support people.

The interviews of such witnesses are conducted by specialists within the Victim Management Section who have undertaken the Specialist Investigative Interviewing program.

The use of the intermediary scheme provides a service for the entirety of contact with the criminal justice system, and allows services to be provided for the vulnerable witness to give their best evidence during the prosecution processes.

Government response: Accepted
Lead agency: South Australia Police
Recommendation progress status: Complete

14 - Criminal Justice Report

In order to assist in the investigation of current allegations of institutional child sexual abuse, each Australian government should ensure that its policing agency:

  1. develops and keeps under review procedures and protocols to guide police and institutions about the information and assistance police can provide to institutions where a current allegation of institutional child sexual abuse is made
  2. develops and keeps under review procedures and protocols to guide the police, other agencies, institutions and the broader community on the information and assistance police can provide to children and parents and the broader community where a current allegation of institutional child sexual abuse is made.

SAPOL has a policy position which directs such matters to be investigated by detectives within the Public Protection Branch (PPB). Procedures and protocols provide guidance to PPB detectives for use in investigations and referrals to other agencies (internal and external) for assistance.

Government response: Accepted
Lead agency: South Australia Police
Recommendation progress status: Complete

15 - Criminal Justice Report

The New South Wales Standard Operating Procedures for Employment Related Child Abuse Allegations and the Joint Investigation Response Team Local Contact Point Protocol should serve as useful precedents for other Australian governments to consider.

The Independent Education Inquiry in South Australia (the Debelle Inquiry) reported in 2013 and recommended procedures that should be put in place to manage allegations of sexual misconduct made against members of staff including volunteers at schools.

As a result, the Chief Executive of the Department for Education has responsibility to correspond with all people who attend that school within certain contexts. For the purpose of determining the appropriateness of that correspondence, there is a specialist multi-agency committee that has been appointed that advises on the content of the letter to be communicated. That committee includes an advocate from the sexual assault sector, the education sector, the police and others.

SAPOL has further developed policies and procedures relating to Child Protection, Sexual Offences and Information Access and Release. This includes principles regarding the sharing of information pursuant to the Information Privacy Principles (IPPS), Information Sharing Guidelines (ISGs) and Instruction published by the Department of the Premier and Cabinet. The IPPS apply to all Government of South Australia agencies. IPPS regulate the way agencies collect, use, store and disclose personal information.

The Public Protection Branch is responsible for notifications to the Department for Education, Department for Child Protection, Department of Human Services and Teacher's Registration Board, and has developed processes regarding notifications to non-government agencies pursuant to IPPS and ISGs.

Mandatory reporting requirements are legislated, ensuring reports are made regarding children who are suspected of being abused or neglected. Legislative and policy frameworks provide guidance regarding applications for bail where someone has been arrested in relation to child sexual offences, pursuant to the Child Sex Offenders Registration Act 2006.

Government response: Accepted
Lead agency: South Australia Police
Recommendation progress status: Complete

20 - Criminal Justice Report

Police should ensure that they review any blind reports they receive and that they are available as intelligence in relation to any current or subsequent police investigations.

If it appears that talking to the survivor might assist with a police investigation, police should contact the relevant institution or survivor advocacy and support group, and police and the institution or group should cooperate to try to find a way in which the survivor will be sufficiently supported so that they are willing to speak to police.

SAPOL has not adopted a policy position regarding ‘blind reporting’ - the practice of reporting to police information about an allegation of child sexual abuse without giving the alleged victim’s name or other identifying details. However, the SAPOL policy position does provide guidance that a police report should not be raised for an incident that is not an obvious breach of the law. In the interest of child protection, SAPOL recommends third party reports on behalf of an unwilling victim rather than blind reporting. Any information received by SAPOL in the context of blind reporting can be recorded for intelligence purposes and searched.

Employees of institutions, survivor advocacy and support groups are able to make third party reports on behalf of a victim with SAPOL, which will be investigated.

Institutions, agencies and support groups should be mandated and aware of their obligations and requirements to report matters to the police under the law, or to child protection agencies in line with mandatory reporting obligations.

Members of the community are able to make anonymous reports via Crime Stoppers for any offence, which will be allocated for investigation.

Government response: Accepted
Lead agency: South Australia Police
Recommendation progress status: Complete

Page last updated: 5 December 2019